A Distorted Perception

A Distorted Perception (Metal) - California




A Distorted Perception was born out of necessity. The two musicians that form A Distorted Perception knew they needed a creative outlet to combine multiple genres and ideas into one. They played in a band since they were 12 in the Philadelphia area for almost 20 years. That former band just didn't scratch their creative itch. The vocalist moved 3000 miles away after overcoming addiction and was ready to create music again.

A Distorted Perception was born. The Plague of One, their debut album is many years in the making. The concept was to take all the ugliness the vocalist had seen in his time in active addiction and turn it int something amazing. They started collaborating across the country to put together a diverse collection of songs. The album will take you through many emotions and dark stories. It will also show there is beauty in all that darkness. A Distorted Perception is an amalgamation of progressive metal, ethereal ambience, heavy guitars, sinister vocals along with melodic vocals. A Distorted Perception is exactly what the name implies. Things are not always as they seem.



-Interview- (7/16/21)
1. How did you get started with music and how did you develop your sound? Who thought of the name “A Distorted Perception" and is there any meaning behind it?

Jimmy: Joe and I found an old Beatles book when we were 12 years old at his parents house. We got some beat up guitars and started teaching ourselves tab. Eventually I talked my parents into buying me a drumset. I was writing the lyrics and we tried bringing people into sing but it never felt right. So, at age 14 i made the switch to vocals. It was terrible and we were terrible but it was fun. We have been making music ever since. This project is different from our old band because I moved to California in 2017 but Joe and I still wanted to make music. A Distorted Perception was born out of this distance we had between us. I'm not entirelly sure who came up with the name. We just knew when we heard it that it felt right. We wanted to create something different. Ultimately, the name conveys the style of the music. When you hear the opening of each song, it will not conform to what the listener expects is going to happen next. This is the distorted perception we ultimately want to deliver with each track.


2. What do you want people to take away from your music?

Jimmy: Our hope is that people connect to it emotionally. Music is subjective, so whatever the listener gets out of it is their personal experience. When I write lyrics, I am trying to tell a story but also leave it vague enough that the interpretation is up to them. As far as the instrumentation, we will use any sounds or tunings needed to make it sound interesting. In the end, we hope people connect with it in some way. A few of the songs on this album are deeply personal "From the Ashes" for me and "To Let It All Out" for Joe. This was many years of struggle and pain to create but it was cathartic. We hope people can feel and identify with those emotions.


3. How would you describe your sound to the average listener?

This is always a tough question. The best I could describe it is a mix of heavy guitars, ethereal ambience and progressive metal with a touch of creepy industrial vibe. Basically if you want straight up downtuned metal, we got something for you. If you want dark and ethereal, we got something for you. If you want something in between, then we also have something for you. If you are looking for uplifting and happy, you are out of luck.


4. Who are three bands you’d like to tour with?

Jimmy: Tool, Deftones and Korn. I've seen Korn a couple dozen times and they have never disappointed. They always put on an amazing show. Deftones has been my favorite band since I was 13. I've seen them a couple dozen times also. They have such an amazing fanbase and their longevity is something to aspire too. Tool are all amazing musicians and would love to pick their brains. Their influence on music in general is amazing.


5. How has Covid affected what you do as a band?

Jimmy: Being in quarantine and having extra time in the studio is actually how A Distorted Perception took off. It gave me time to actually learn music theory. We always played music but we never had a clue what key we were playing in. It has opened up our creativity and I am thrilled with how the album came out because of it. It honestly kept us from focusing on how crazy the world has become and creating something beautiful in all that darkness. I also spent many hours improving my mixing and mastering skills. A Lot of trial and error but I feel good about what we put out on this Album.


6. What’s your take on the current state of Metal?

Jimmy: I actually think Metal is in a pretty good spot. Some amazing albums came out within the past year or so Gojira's "Fortitude", Trivium's "What the dead men say" and Deftones "OHMS to name a few. The entire industry has suffered because of album sale declines and the lack of live shows because of Covid. I'm excited to get back to live shows real soon.


7. What’s the current local music scene like there in California?

Jimmy: We have a fairly decent local music scene out here. Whatever your flavor they have somewhere for you go. Lots of local clubs and bars. There is a big cover band scene out here also. I just saw a System of a down cover band called "Toxicity" a few weeks back. They are pretty amazing live. Everything is slowly opening back up.


8. What’s your take on the royalties that streaming services pay out to artists?

Honestly?? It's a joke. They pay you pennies for all the hard work you put into it. Maybe if you are getting millions of streams you can make a living off of streaming but local up and coming musicians make next to nothing. You really have to love making music because if you go into this trying to make money you are in for a rude awakening.


9. What’s next for A Distorted Perception?

We already started working on the next material. This album "The Plague of One" was about the destruction of civilization, the next album is going to be about the dystopia that is left behind. It will be more technical, bigger and denser production. We know have the tools at our disposal to just be creative.


10. Any shoutouts?

We just want to shout out our family and friends that believed in us all these years, came to our shows and supported us. They have been there since we just kids and they have stuck with us through it all. We thank you and we love you.